Social Care in Crisis

Due to years of austerity cuts to Local Authorities, these authorities are having to spread more thinly, each year the amount of money they have all over the many areas of their responsibilities and Social Care is one of those areas.

But each year with an aging population and more persons with disabilities living longer, the people needing Social Care is increasing while the money available to help care for these needs is reducing.

In addition there is an increasing need for employed carers to provide the care the people with these needs require. But there is a shortage of people wishing to come into care and why is this?

The rate of pay within the care industry is abysmal for most employed carers receive a wage based on the *National Living Wage, currently £7.83, which will increase to £8.21 on the first of April 2019.

While the Living Wage is £9.00.

Being an employed carer is more than, cleansing, washing, dressing and meal preparation, as they are, in many instances, one of the few people that the people with care needs see.

Also there could be instances where the employed carer needs to deal with financial responsibilities, provide emotional support, manage prescriptions and administer medication, monitor Safeguarding and many more areas of responsibility and paying just the National Living Wage is not sufficient to cover all these responsibilities.

It is therefore, that the Living Wage would be more near a level to pay, but Local Authorities do not have the finance to pay this, currently and therefore this current Government needs to take this on board and increase the funding to Local Authorities.

With this in mind, FLASh (Families Lobbying and Advising Sheffield) have created an EPetition, Pay All Employed Carers the Living Wage.

Please see the following

flash logo.jpg 2

 

FLASh (Families Lobbying & Advising Sheffield) are concerned about the continuance of Social Care within the UK.

The Care Industry is in a state of crisis as there is insufficient funding from Local Authorities to Care Service Providers to pay the carers they employ a wage of sufficient amount for the work these carers are required to provide which matches the responsibilities they have to undertake to the persons to whom they are providing care to.

These Local Authorities have, for many years, under this current Tory Government, been subjected to austerity cuts to the funding they receive from this Government, which impacts on the money these authorities have available to provide this funding.

Therefore, FLASh have created an EPetition ‘Pay all employed Carers the Living Wage.

Please view this EPetition and seriously consider signing the EPetition and then verify your signature though the link provided in the email you will receive. Until your signature is verified your signature will not be activated.

The EPetition ‘Pay all employed Carers the Living Wage’ can be accessed here.

Should you be unable to view the EPetition, please copy and paste the following; https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/236151 into your browser.

Once you have verified your signature please could you share this EPetition with your colleagues, friends and any other connections.

Please also forward to your MP and your Local Councillors.

Thank you for your support.

 

If you wish to know more about FLASh a link to their website is here. If you are a family carer in Sheffield for someone with a Learning Disability or Autism and you wish to become a member of FLASh and/or attend the monthly meetings please advise your email address to flashld575@gmail.com

Chris Sterry, Vice-chair of FLASh issues his own Newsletter, on at least a monthly basis. To receive this Newsletter on a regular basis please email Chris on ldcarersbuttygroup@gmail.com and a copy of the Newsletter can be accessed here.

 

 

 

* Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

Advertisements

How Carer Voice was Started

3 Family Carers of relatives with Learning Disabilities and/or Autism (Chris Sterry, Judith Gwynn and Kate Chapman) started working together with a PHd student (Rachael A Black) at the University of Sheffield (Department of Human Communication Sciences) using the framework of Co-production. This was initially to provide research for Rachael’s thesis required for her PHd, but also to have a meaningful outcome for LD Carers within Sheffield, UK

At the start of this co-production Rachael enquired through Sheffield Mencap & Gateway for carers of persons with Learning Disabilities to work with her on her PHd project. During the last 18 months we have had regular meetings at the University of Sheffield on how we would proceed with this project and what our initial outcomes would be. Initially through general discussions, which Rachael was recording, it became clear that the recurring situations was around carers communications with the range of Service Providers. Within the context of Service Providers it included Sheffield Adult Social Care through Sheffield City Council, various health providers ( being GPs, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Community Health, and many other health areas) together with the independent Care Providers including charities, voluntary and private independent providers.

So that we were not restricted around our own views we decided to create 2 surveys, 1 to be completed by LD carers reflecting on their interactions with Service Providers and the other survey to be completed by Service Providers reflecting on their interactions with LD Carers. The surveys were created on Survey Monkey and during their creation we had a number of meeting to discuss how these were to be formed, the number of questions to be included and the specific questions. When we were all satisfied with both surveys they went live on Survey Monkey and electronic links were disseminated through our various range of contacts within Sheffield, UK.

We also discussed how we wished to to use the information from these surveys in addition to the original outcome for Rachael’s thesis. and decided we would wish to do this in a form of a presentation. We looked at possible dates and venues and obtained costings and also viewed each venue and then using co-production decided which venue to book and how we would advertise the event and provide a means for LD Carers and Service Providers to book to attend the event, which we did through Eventbrite and agreed on a format for a flyer and a website (Carer Voice) and the event title being Carer Voice Working Together.

Working Together Event Presentation 2017

 

Carer Voice ‘Working Together’, The Presenters from left to right, Chris Sterry, Judith Gwynn, Rachael A Black and Kate Chapman
Carer Voice ‘Working Together’, Presenter Rachael A Black Stating the Principles of Co-production
Carer Voice ‘Working Together’ Carers and Service Providers working together
Carer Voice ‘Working Together’ Presenter Judith Gwynn answering questions at the end of the Presentation
Carer Voice ‘Working Together’ Presenter Kate Chapman answering questions

Carer Voice Final Notes

Thank you for coming today and now you have seen the presentation and been involved in the workshops in which carers and service providers have worked together. This is how it should be for we are all here for the same reason, to ensure vulnerable persons, be they be our relatives or not, have provision to ensure their needs are met and they can then led their own lives.

Communication is but one key, but an extremely important key and without it all that is there can fail.

With this in mind I facilitate a support group LD Carers Butty Group, also known as Central group or Butty Group, where there is also a website LD Carers Butty Group and a mailing/distribution list. There are other support groups and details of these can be obtained from the Carers Centre and from Cathy and Kirsty from Sheffield Mencap & Gateway (Sharing Caring Project).

If you wish to be included in the mailing/distribution list please advise your email address. While this was produced with carers in mind, it does not mean that service providers cannot be included. Information sent will include areas relating to disability both local and national as well as notes for the support meetings.

Lunch is now ready and there are some leaflets from a selection of providers please view and take away and continue to network throughout lunch.

Do not forget to put on a post it the message you are taking away from this event and an evaluation form will be emailed to you, please return with your comments.

Our thanks to

University of Sheffield, Department of Human Communication Sciences for funding the event

Sheffield Central Fire Station for the room

Healthwatch Sheffield for the pens

Carer Voice ‘Working Together’, Chris Sterry giving the closing statement

 

After the Carer Voice : Working Together event we sent the following email to everyone who attended the event and also to those persons who could not attend but did express an interest in the event.

“We just wanted to get in touch to give you an update on the work we are doing following the Working Together Event in October.

 As a group we have met once to go through the feedback and will be meeting again in December. Where we will start drafting some standards and guidelines for communication between family carers and providers of service based on the information you gave us.  

 In early 2018 we will email these to you for your feedback. If you would not like to receive these emails then please do let me know and I will remove your name form the mailing list.

 We are also planning to pull together a small working group in the New Year to ensure the standards are accessible and practical. If you would be interested in being in this group, please do let us know. It will consist of 2 to 3 meetings at the University of Sheffield.

 Please also find attached some information about care workers in the independent and charity sector and the flu vaccine which we hope will be of use to you.

If you would be interested in receiving a copy of the presentation we gave on the day please do get in touch and I will send this to you.

Many thanks

Rachael and Carer Voice”

Flu Vaccine for Care Workers

Supporting People with Learning Disabilities get Flu Injection

 

We have now met in December and have started drafting some standards and guidelines for communication between family carers and providers of services based on the information given to us during the Carer Voice : Working Together event.

The draft documents were produced.

So we could enage with service providers we held 3 meetings.

Intialy we met with  representatives of Sheffield Adult Social Carer and Sheffield City Council Commissioning who viewed the documents and made some comments regarding some minor alterations.

The second meeting was with some service care providers who also made some contructive comments.

The final meeting was with representatives of Sheffield Clinical Commissioning Group, who also welcomed the documents and wished to use these in conjunction the their ‘For Pete’s Sake’ campaign’ and offered us a 15 minute presentation slot in the Assistive Technology event on the 28 June 2018.

Chris gave the presentation at the event and it was very appreciated by the atendees.

The presentation can be viewed  here

 

 

New campaign to recruit thousands more adult social care staff – GOV.UK

A new national recruitment campaign to help fill the 110,000 vacancies in the adult social care sector has launched.

The ‘Every Day Is Different’ campaign will show how rewarding social care careers can be – 96% of care professionals feel their work makes a difference to people’s lives. It will also highlight the opportunities for progression and professional development.

The campaign aims to:

  • attract new people with the right values to the sector and increase interest in adult social care as a vocation
  • highlight the range of job roles, with an initial focus on direct care roles such as care workers, where there is the most demand
  • equip the social care sector with the marketing tools to support the campaign and advice to recruit and retain the right people, to address a high turnover rate.

Over 1.45 million people work in the sector at the moment. It is predicted an additional 650,000 workers will be needed by 2035 to keep up with the rising numbers of people aged 65 and over.

Working in adult social care is about providing personal and practical support to help people live their lives.

 

*Source: New campaign to recruit thousands more adult social care staff – GOV.UK

 

*Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.

Ministers block release of ‘no deal Brexit’ social care recruitment plans | AccessAble

Ministers are refusing to release information that would show what extra plans – if any – the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has put in place to deal with an adult social care recruitment crisis in the event of a “no deal Brexit”.

With just 43 days until Britain faces the possibility of leaving the European Union without a deal in place, DHSC claimed that “premature” release of the information could put at risk “effective policy formulation and development regarding our exit from the EU”.

Instead of releasing its records, it has pointed to “high level” plans published just before Christmas, but they suggest that ministers have no plans in place to deal with an adult social care recruitment crisis.

Disabled people who use personal assistants (PAs) have warned repeatedly of the risk that any form of Brexit could mean their access to PAs from EU countries could dry up, with a no-deal Brexit making this even more likely.

Inclusion London said in December that the impact of Brexit on social care recruitment was “potentially disastrous”.

The refusal by DHSC to release the information came in response to a freedom of information request from Disability News Service (DNS).

 

Source: Ministers block release of ‘no deal Brexit’ social care recruitment plans | AccessAble

Government launches recruitment drive for adult social care – ITV News

The Government has launched a recruitment campaign to try to plug a hole of 110,000 vacancies in the social care workforce.

More than 1.45 million people work in social care at the moment, but an extra 650,000 workers will be needed by 2035 due to an ageing population, ministers said.

The move was welcomed by charities but they said more needed to be done to improve working conditions and pay.

The new campaign – Every Day Is Different – also comes as the Health Foundation published its own report on the NHS workforce, expressing concerns about the growing number of staff shortages across the board.

Social care is a hugely important service on which many depend and more needs to be done to make it an attractive career

Caroline Abrahams, Age UK

It said there were “worrying trends” in community care, with a drop in nurses and health visitors in the community.

The new Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) campaign aims to promote social care as a career with good progression and professional development.

It will promote a range of roles, including carer in a nursing home, activities co-ordinator in the community, hospital occupational therapist and personal assistant in a person’s home.

Care minister Caroline Dinenage said: “There is huge demand for more care professionals who work incredibly hard to look after the most vulnerable people in our society.

“We must spread the word that careers in adult social care can be rewarding, varied and worthwhile.

 

Source: Government launches recruitment drive for adult social care – ITV News

Please help our research on charging for Social Care – DPAC

Following on from the Independent Living Strategy Group report into charging for social care we’d like to get more information on charging and how it is affecting people.

Please could people fill in details in the form below.

Could you also email us at mail@dpac.uk.net if you’d be willing to speak to the journalist Frances Ryan about charging and it’s impact on your lives and support.

We are also looking for someone who is willing to be in a video about the negative impact charging has on their ability to access the care and support they need or who has been left in debt by these charges for use in a separate campaign. Again please email us at mail@dpac.uk.net if you are interested.

The ILSG report can be viewed https://www.disabilityrightsuk.org/sites/default/files/pdf/Chargingsurveyreport-18Nov2018.pdf

To proceed to the form to fill in please clink link here

 

Source: Please help our research on charging for Social Care – DPAC

MedicineGov Virtual Conference 8 November 2018

For the Virtual Conference I, Chris Sterry, produced a number of videos on a number of subjects relating to caring. Unfortunately, at that time, I was suffering with a severe chest infection and this has, in some respects, affected the sound quality.

The subjects being :

Carer Voice Project

Chris Sterry discussing the Carer Voice Project that he and 2 other learning disability carers and a student from University of Sheffield were involved with. A project based on the principles of Co-production around communication between LD Carers and Service Providers. The final outcome was various documents which hopefully could be used by providers to help with communication between themselves and family carers.

Chris can be contacted on carervoice@gmail.com

How I Cope with it

Chris Sterry discussing how he copes or deals with being a carer, stating his health conditions, the support required, support available and many other aspects.

Chris can be contacted on carervoice@gmail.com

Ageing

Chris Sterry discussing ageing and how this affects caring for persons with disabilities and autism, Where is the support from CCG and Adult Social Care.

Chris can be contacted at carervoice@gmail.com

This is a video created for the MedGov Virtual Conference on 8 November 2018

Negative Attitudes

Chris Sterry discussing negative attitudes he has found within care and hopefully ways to overcome these.

Chris can be contacted at carervoice@gmail.com

A video prepared for the MedGov Virtual Conerfence in November 2018

Care Act 2014

Chris Sterry, family carer discusses the Care Act 2014 for the MedGov Virtual Conference 8 November 2018.

Chris can be contacted at carervoice@gmail.com

My Experiences

I am Chris Sterry, a family carer for my adult daughter. On this video I am discussing my experiences of being a family carer for the MedGov Virtual Conference on 8 November 2018.

Chris can be contacted at carervoice@gmail.com

Thats all for now.

When I venture into producing more videos I hope my health will be better and then hopefully will be the sound quality.